Integument

 


Plate

Figure

Slide

Comments
A. Thin skin

58

59

2,3

1-3
61
62
66
All of these slides show examples of thin skin. All are H&E.
B. Thick skin

58

1

63

suppl.

Thick skin, H&E.
C. Hair follicle

63

1

61 

66

These slides show hair follicles with their associated sebaceous glands and arrector pili muscles. Note the follicles that are cut in cross and oblique section revealing the three layers of the hair (medulla, cortex, and cuticle) as well as the following components of the follicle: internal root sheath composed of cuticle, Huxley's layer and Henle's layer; external root sheath; bulb; and connective tissue sheath. H&E.

D. Sweat glands

60

61

1,2

1
61
62
63
66
Eccrine sweat glands are located in the hypodermis (subcutaneous layer) and are connected to the surface of the skin by a duct, whereas the ducts of apocrine sweat glands (61) terminate in hair follicles. H&E.
E. Sebaceous glands

61

2,3
61
66
Look for large, pale-staining cells associated with hair follicles; H&E.
F. Sensory receptors
1. Pacinian corpuscle

62

1,2
41
42

Mesentery, whole mount.

Pancreas, H&E.

2. Meissner's corpuscle

62

1,3

63
Look just beneath the epidermis in the papillary layer of the dermis; H&E.
G. Melanocytes

59

2

62
The melanocytes (pigment cells) of the skin reside in the stratum germinativum. They can be detected because they contain large amounts of the black pigment, melanin.
H. Nails

63

2
64
65
In this longitudinal section through the finger of a human fetus the following components of the nail can be seen: nail body, composed of several layers of flat keratinized cells; the root of the nail, under the skin; the eponychium, which is the cornified extension (stratum corneum) of the nail wall that extends out over the base of the nail; the nail bed, lying under the body, and which terminates in the matrix under the base of the nail.

 




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Version: 990814